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Metals Urine Test


About the Test

Heavy metals toxicity caused by increasing levels of pollution and use of chemicals in industry is a growing threat to our health and development of our children. High levels of toxic metals deposited in body tissues and subsequently in the brain, may cause significant developmental and neurological damage.

Find out more about the sources of heavy metal toxicity here.

Why Choose Metals Urine Test?

Urine toxic and essential elements analysis is an invaluable tool for the assessment of retention of toxic metals in the body and the status of essential nutrient elements. Toxic metals do not have any useful physiological function, adversely affect almost every organ system, and disrupt the homeostasis of nutrient elements.

Analysis of the levels of toxic metals in urine after the administration of a metal detoxification agent is an objective way to evaluate the accumulation of toxic metals. Acute metal poisoning is rare. More common, however, is a chronic, low-level exposure to toxic metals that can result in significant retention in the body that can be associated with a vast array of adverse health effects and chronic disease. One cannot draw valid conclusions about adverse health effects of metals without assessing net retention. For an individual, toxicity occurs when net retention exceeds physiological tolerance. Net retention is determined by the difference between the rates of assimilation and excretion of metals. To evaluate net retention, one compares the levels of metals in urine before and after the administration of a pharmaceutical metal detoxification agent such as EDTA, DMSA or DMPS. Different compounds have different affinities for specific metals, but all function by sequestering "hidden" metals from deep tissue stores and mobilizing the metals to the kidneys for excretion in the urine. Guidelines for collection periods after administration of the most commonly utilized agents are provided in the table below:

Common Agents

Half Life

Collection Period

EDTA

~1 hr

6 – 24 hrs

DMPS (IV)

~1 hr

2 – 6 hrs

DMPS (oral)

~9 hrs

6 – 9 hrs

DMSA

  4 hrs

6 – 9 hrs

It is important to perform both pre-and post-provocation urinalysis to permit distinction between ongoing exposures to metals (pre-) and net bodily retention. The pre-provocation urine collection can also be utilized to assess the rate of creatinine clearance if a serum specimen is also submitted.

Many clinicians also request the analysis of essential elements in urine specimens to evaluate nutritional status and the efficacy of mineral supplementation during metal detoxification therapy. Metal detoxification agents can significantly increase the excretion of specific nutrient elements such as zinc, copper, manganese, and molybdenum.

Chromium metabolism authorities suggest that 24-hour chromium excretion likely provides the best assessment of chromium status. Early indication of renal dysfunction can be gleaned from urinary wasting of essential elements such as magnesium, calcium, potassium and sodium in an unprovoked specimen.


The Benefits of Metals Testing

  • Determine if metal toxicity or mineral deficiency is contributing to the disorder
  • Monitor the effects of chelation (elimination of heavy metals from the body)
  • Identify if supplementation of important minerals may bring about significant improvements

Testimonial


Metals and Minerals Testing by Rachel West, D.O.

Analyte List

    Essential:
  • Boron
  • Calcium
  • Chromium
  • Cobalt
  • Copper
  • Iron
  • Lithium
  • Magnesium
  • Manganese
  • Molybdenum
  • Phosphorus
  • Potassium
  • Selenium
  • Sodium
  • Strontium
  • Sulfur
  • Vanadium
  • Zinc
    Toxic:
  • Aluminum
  • Antimony
  • Arsenic
  • Barium
  • Beryllium
  • Bismuth
  • Cadmium
  • Lead
  • Mercury
  • Nickel
  • Platinum
  • Thallium
  • Thorium
  • Tin
  • Tungsten
  • Uranium

Specimen Requirements

The random urine collection requires 50 mL of urine. A chelating agent is recommended for best results.

The timed and 24 hour urine collection requires the patient to collect every urine specimen over a specified period of time. The physician will determine the collection time based on the type of chelating used or the evaluation needed for comparison. If using a chelating agent, the patient should take the chelating agent 1 hour prior to starting the collection of specimen.


Kit Instructions

For urine instructions please click here.


CPT Codes

  • 82108
  • 82495
  • 83018
  • 83735
  • 83885
  • 84255
  • No Medicare Coverage
  • 82175
  • 82525
  • 83540
  • 83785
  • 84100
  • 84300
  • 82300
  • 82570
  • 83655
  • 83825
  • 84133
  • 84630



Metals Urine Test:


Metals Urine Test (Random collection)

Metals Urine Test: (24 hour collection)


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11813 W. 77th St., Lenexa, KS 66214 USA | Phone: 913-341-8949 | Fax: 913-341-6207
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